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Waitrose Pledges £Millions to Champion Nature-Friendly Farming

Waitrose, the UK supermarket chain renowned for its quality produce, has pledged to invest millions in transforming the way its farmers work, with a focus on regenerative agriculture. 



This ambitious plan aims to support over 2,000 British farmers in adopting nature-friendly practices by 2035.

The move comes amidst growing consumer concern over the environmental impact of modern farming. 


Regenerative agriculture, which prioritises soil health and biodiversity, has emerged as a promising solution to challenges like topsoil erosion and climate change.


Speaking at the Waitrose-owned Leckford Estate, where regenerative farming has been practiced since 2020, Executive Director James Bailey outlined the company's commitment to revolutionise the British food system. 


He envisions a future where customers can confidently choose produce that is not only delicious but also sustainable and environmentally responsible.


Waitrose plans to offer financial support, resources, and expertise to farmers transitioning to regenerative practices. A dedicated Centre of Excellence at Leckford will provide hands-on training and guidance. Additionally, the supermarket will collaborate with LEAF (Linking Environment And Farming) and the University of Reading to further research and knowledge-sharing in this field.



This bold initiative builds upon the Partnership's broader sustainability goals, including achieving net-zero emissions in its own operations by 2035 and across its entire supply chain by 2050.


Waitrose's commitment to regenerative agriculture signifies a landmark shift in the supermarket's approach to sourcing, prioritising the long-term health of the land and the livelihoods of British farmers. With consumers increasingly demanding sustainable and ethical food choices, this move is poised to resonate with shoppers and set a precedent for the wider industry.


"We have a duty to help our farmers make the move towards more nature-friendly growing," said James Bailey, "and we're committed to playing our part in the revolution that our country's food system requires."


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