Amazon to begin selling its own food range online

The retail giant will allow shoppers to add hundreds of ‘By Amazon’ and ‘Our Selection’ products to their virtual baskets.

Amazon is adding own-brand groceries to its UK website to bolster its online offering, as the retail titan steps up its assault on British supermarkets.

The business will allow shoppers to add hundreds of “By Amazon” and “Our Selection” products to their virtual baskets in the coming weeks.

Bosses are expected to launch an advertising blitz to promote the ranges as they seek to attract more customers to its Fresh service, sources said. The range spans fresh produce, ready-meals and other cupboard essentials.

Amazon began offering free grocery delivery to millions of Prime members in Britain last summer, in a bid to challenge traditional grocers.

It has also opened a handful of physical shops in London, called Amazon Fresh, and plans to launch more.


The company has about 20 grocery stores in the US. In 2017, it bought US grocer Wholefoods, which has a handful of British sites.

But despite its threatening position, Amazon still has a tiny role in the UK grocery arena compared with the “Big Four”.

It already sells groceries from Morrisons and Northern chain Booths on its website.

Although Morrisons has its own food factories, the “By Amazon” range is not supplied by the supermarket chain.



Their existing partnership has led to speculation the e-commerce behemoth would try to make a swoop for Morrisons to cement its position in UK grocery.

However, Morrisons is instead at the centre of a takeover battle between US firms Fortress and Clayton, Dubilier & Rice.

The latter recently increased its offer for the supermarket to £10bn, including debt, to get the deal over the line. It needs the approval of 75pc of shareholders.

Meanwhile, CD&R, whose bid is being fronted by the former Tesco boss Sir Terry Leahy, has until the end of this week to come back with an improved offer after its previous bid was rebuffed by the Morrisons board.


Source: The Telegraph