Food banks warn third of parcels being given to children as charities ration fresh produce

They said food banks are having to cut back on supplying fresh fruit and vegetables and that volunteers are "overstretched and exhausted".

Bosses of major food banks warned of a third of parcels being given to children living in poverty and said the cost of living crisis was forcing charities to ration supplies.


The Trussell Trust and the Independent Food Aid Network (IFAN) urged the Scottish Government to act in order to mitigate the crisis, including by ruling it “exceptional circumstances” in a letter.


Polly Jones, of the Trussell Trust, and Sabine Goodwin, of IFAN, penned a joint letter to Social Justice Secretary Shona Robison warning demand for food banks had increased since the UK Government withdrew £20 a week from Universal Credit in October 2021.


Spiralling energy costs as well as food and transport costs being hiked meant ‘demand outstrips resources’, it was warned.


Polly Jones, of the Trussell Trust, and Sabine Goodwin, of IFAN, said: “Over the last 12 years, increasing numbers of people are being pushed to the doors of food banks because they haven’t got enough money to buy food.


“Since the cut to Universal Credit and the start of the cost-of living crisis in October 2021, demand for charitable food aid has steadily increased.


“People who were already struggling to afford food are being hit the hardest as energy, food and travel costs all become out of reach.

“Alarmingly, we are seeing a growing number of parcels being provided for children.


“More than one in three food parcels issued in the Trussell Trust network last year were for children, and the next 12 months look bleaker still.


“Many food bank teams are struggling to cope as demand outstrips resources and they make difficult decisions about rationing supply and dipping into financial reserves.”


They said food banks are having to cut back on supplying fresh fruit and vegetables and that volunteers are “overstretched and exhausted”.


Source: The London Economic